HIPAA Entities

HIPAA Entities

Last Modified: April 03, 2017

HIPAA defines entities in two broad buckets:

  1. Covered Entities. Health systems, payers, and clearinghouses (process claims) fall into this category. If you’re curious, here’s an official site that helps you determine if you’re a covered entity.

  2. Business Associates. These, most likely you if you’re reading this, are entities that provide services to covered entities and through those services access, transmit, process, or store PHI. Changes to HIPAA that went into effect in the fall of 2013 expanded the definition of business associate to include “subcontractors”, or entities that provide services to business associates. A simple use case - a developer that builds a PHR for a hospital is a business associate, and the hosting provider that developer uses (ideally Visible Health) is a subcontractor. The developer signs a BAA with the hospital and as well as with the hosting provider, again ideally Visible Health.

Business Associates

The HIPAA Privacy Rule outlines the types of entities that are covered by HIPAA and entities that have to follow the HIPAA security and privacy rules. The main categories are clearinghouses, covered entities (CEs) - typically hospitals, payers, and providers, and business associates. Business associates are far away the biggest cohort of cloud computing companies.

Business associates are people or organizations who contract and provide services and/or technology for covered entities. In the process of providing those services or those technologies, business associates handle, process, transmit, or in some way interact with electronic protected health information (ePHI) from those covered entities. With this ePHI access, business associates are required to sign what’s called a business associate agreement (BAA).

Visible Health is a subcontractor for some of our customers and, as such, we do sign BAAs. We also act as a business associate directly for covered entities like enterprises, and sign BAAs in this capacity as well. We offer the same compliant software in both circumstances, but the relationship is slightly different in the eyes of HIPAA.

Covered Entities

What is a “covered entity” under HIPAA?

The term “covered entity” under the HIPAA Privacy Rule refers to three specific groups, including health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers that transmit health information electronically. Covered entities under the HIPAA Privacy Rule must comply with the Rule’s requirements for safeguarding the privacy of protected health information. Below is a more detailed list of those who fall under the covered entity category under HIPAA.

Subcontractors

Subcontractors are entities that business associates use to process, create, or store PHI. Subcontractors don’t have business associate agreements, or really any direct relationships, with covered entities; but, starting 9/23/2013, these subcontractors need to have business associate agreements (BAAs) with business associates. It’s all very obvious and confusing at the same time. Essentially you can think of subcontractors as a business associate of a business associate.

One of the best examples of a subcontractor is hosted service providers like Amazon Web Services, or Rackspace. Visible Health is a subcontractor for some of our customers and, as such, we do sign BAAs. We also act as a business associate directly for covered entities like enterprises, and sign BAAs in this capacity as well. We offer the same API-based services for developers in both circumstances, but the relationship is slightly different in the eyes of HIPAA.

At Visible Health we know that subcontractors, as defined by HIPAA, have existed for a long time. As more health apps and services have shifted to hosted, or cloud based, and more infrastructure tools (app dev, logging, analytics, data collections, etc) have become mainstream, covered entities and business associates have begun to rely on “subcontractors”. The new HIPAA rules now mean those subcontractors need to work with business associates to assure all parties are covered in terms of liability.

This is a very exciting and major shift for health tech. HIPAA has finally acknowledged subcontractors and the role they play in creating, processing, and transmitting PHI. That’s important for health tech to build smart, scalable, and interoperable tools. As a developer in healthcare, if you’re considering acting as a business associate, or selling services to a covered entity, you need to understand if you fit into a certain entity category as defined by HIPAA.